Tag Archives: food

NYC Food Police: Keeping New Yawkers safe from the evil Big Mac

Newsweek reports that as of this past Monday, New York City’s health department began ticketing restaurants that haven’t complied with the new law requiring them to post calorie counts on their menus.

By the end of Monday, five restaurants had been ticketed. The perpetrators: Dunkin’ Donuts, McDonalds, Popeye’s, Sbarro and TGIFridays.

Lucky for them that the citations were little more than warnings. They carried no fines, because a federal judge had said the city could not impose fines until mid-July. When imposed, the fines will range from $200 to $2,000.

And what about those rebels that refuse to go along with this by-law? While the New York State Restaurant Association has taken the city of New York to court over this issue, the restaurateurs themselves seem to be falling into line.

And just to make sure they do, the form that the city gave to the offending restaurants carried the warning that the health department “expects that the conditions will be addressed promptly.” The form cautioned that “any recurrence of these conditions could result in further action being taken.”

Maybe they should call in McDonaldland’s former Chief of Police, Big Mac.

my fitness site

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under In the News

Walmart: Your First Choice for Organic Food???

Diets explained has moved!

Hey everyone,

I have recently decided to transfer the content of my fitness site (http://fitnessmadesimple.wordpress.com) and my diet/nutrition site (https://dietsexplained.wordpress.com/) to my new blog:

http://healthhabits.wordpress.com/

I was getting a lot of questions on topics other than diet and fitness training. With a more general health blog, I can focus on topics not specifically exercise or diet.

I hope everyone enjoys

DR

p.s. This particular post is available here.

.

There was a time in the not so distant past, when organic food was a niche market. Organic products were bought and sold by the same ‘crunchy granola’ demographic.

Not any more.

In fact, since 1990, organic food sales in the United States and Canada have been growing at approximately 20% per year. In 2006, sales of organic food in the United States and Canada topped $18 billion.

These numbers have caught the attention of the mainstream agri-business industry.

As you can see in the chart below, the growth in organic food sales is being driven by mainstream supermarkets.

Over the past decade, the growth in organic food sales from natural food stores and the ‘direct to consumer’ route has been increasing at a moderate rate.

The same can’t be said for sales made at supermarkets. In 1998, organic food sales in supermarkets are half the size of the sales in natural food stores. However, in 2006, supermarket sales have grown to be neck and neck with the natural food stores.

There is money to be made. And big business is good at making big money.

The following charts illustrate how North America’s largest food processors have increased their share of the organic food market.

Organic Industry Structure: Top 30 Acquisitions – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Top 30 Introductions – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Significant Acquistions and Introductions – pdf

The following chart highlights the major independent organic food processors and their brands.

Organic Industry Structure: Major Independents and Their Brands – pdf

This chart illustrates the Private Label organic food brands available in North America

Organic Industry Structure: Private Label Brands – pdf

This chart presents a time line of the acquisitions and mergers of the 4 major organic food retailers.

Please note that on August 27, 2007, Whole Foods officially completed their buyout of Wild Oats.

Organic Industry Structure: Retail Acquisitions and Mergers – pdf

Organic Industry Structure: Whole Foods and Wild Oats Locations – pdf

This chart illustrates the concentration of the organic food market at the distribution level.

Organic Industry Structure: Distributor Acquisitions and Mergers – pdf

All of this data was originally organized by Dr. Philip Howard. I was introduced to it via this post from Lucas @ wwje.

The purpose of this post is not to disparage any of the players involved in growing, distributing or selling of organic food.

My goal is to raise awareness in consumers to the fact that as the organic food industry grew, it changed.

The whale swallowed the minnow. Organic is now a marketing term. And the practices that endeared organic food to the early adopters may becoming endangered.

my fitness site


4 Comments

Filed under Diet - General, In the News

U.N., World Bank and IMF & their Food Riots

Over the last few days, representatives of the U.N. met with 27 international agency heads in the Swiss capital, Bern, to chart a solution to food price rises that have caused hunger, riots and hoarding in poor countries.

As reported by Reuters, the United Nations said today that “We consider that the dramatic escalation in food prices worldwide has evolved into an unprecedented challenge of global proportions.”

This group, consisting of the heads of U.N. agencies, funds and programs, the IMF and the World Bank under the leadership of U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon , will set priorities for a plan of action and make sure it is carried out.

The recent surge in food prices is said to be due to several factors, including increased demand in developing countries, higher fuel costs, drought in Australia, the use of crops for bio-fuels, and speculation on global commodity markets.

The group is also urging countries not to use export bans as a tool to maintain the food supply of their own country.

So let me get this straight:

World leaders (business, gov’t, NGO) use the IMF/World Bank to encourage the governments of ‘developing nations’ to sell farm land to multi-national corporations. Farm land that used to sustain the native population is used to grow flowers and other export-only crops like coffee and cocoa.

Al Gore and the environmental-industrial complex creates an atmosphere of fear and political correctness throughout the world. The expansion of bio-fuels is one of the results of this fear.

The financial leaders of the world create another world wide panic over sub-prime mortgages and the related ABCP.

We are told that the world is running out of oil.

We are told that as China & India grow, oil supplies will become more scare due to increased industrial and automotive use.

Now we are told that the world is running out of food.

What the @**&%$#

Why do we give ‘these’ people control over our lives?

my fitness site

4 Comments

Filed under In the News

Re-name the Bagel-ful

While I am sure that Kraft spent a bazillion dollars coming up with the perfect name for this engineered food-type product, I think I can do better.

How about you?

Here is what I came up with:

Bagel-ful-of-goo
Bagel-ful-of-artificial cheese product
Bagel-ful-of-chemicals & preservatives
Bagel-ful-of-impaired insulin sensitivity
Bagel-ful-of-why-is-my-butt-so-big
Bagel-ful-of-my-mom-is-to-lazy-to-even-make-a-real-sandwich

Bagel-ful-of-crap
(pardonnez moi mon francais)

My fitness blog

7 Comments

Filed under In the News

The 100 Mile Diet

The 100 Mile Diet is not really a diet in the modern sense (a regimen of eating and drinking sparingly so as to reduce ones weight).

It is truer to the ancient Greek definition diaita, which means literally, manner of living.

The 100 Mile Diet is a practice of deprivation; it is a manner of living or lifestyle.

Originally coined by James MacKinnon and Alisa Smith , the 100 Mile Diet refers to the practice of consuming food that has been grown, manufactured or produced within a 100 mile radius of the person consuming the food.

On the first day of spring in 2005, James and Alisa chose to confront the fact that when the average North American sits down to a meal, they are sitting down to foods that have travelled over 1500 miles.

In an attempt to confront and bring attention to this practice, they decided to only consume food and drink that was produced within 100 miles of their apartment in Vancouver, British Columbia.

When the average North American sits down to eat, each ingredient has typically travelled at least 1,500 miles—Alisa & James call it “the SUV diet.” On the first day of spring, 2005, Alisa and James chose to confront this unsettling statistic with a simple experiment. For one year, they would buy or gather their food and drink from within 100 miles of their apartment in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Soon after they began to chronicle their experiment on their blog at thetyee.ca, the blogosphere and ultimately the mainstream media became aware of their 100 Mile Diet. With this unexpected attention, came the creation of a grassroots 100 Mile community.

People all across North America began to look at the food they ate in a new way. What am I eating? Where did it come from? What goes into it? What are the repercussions of consuming this food?

There is also a connection between this diet and the proponents of this diet (known as locavores) to the concept of sustainability. And while the terms, locavore and sustainability may be relatively new, the concept is not.

The connection between food and ethics has been explored in literary form in the books:

Diet for a New America

Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook

The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Fast Food Nation

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life

The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating

While future posts will focus on diets that follow the modern definition of diet, I welcome any questions/concerns about this posting.

My fitness blog

5 Comments

Filed under Diets - explained